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imageMartin Goldberg worked at Thorpe Hall school for 23 years

Indecent images of pupils have been found on the computer of an Essex deputy head teacher who was recently found dead, police say.

Martin Goldberg, 46, a maths teacher at Thorpe Hall School in Southend, died at his home two weeks ago.

Essex Police said it had recovered images which appeared to have come from a camera hidden inside a bag.

It was used to film boys undressing in the school's changing rooms and at Southend's leisure centre.

The images, reportedly both video and stills, are believed to have been made from 2000 onwards, and "would appear to be of boys aged from nine to 12," police said.

Detectives have identified four children from the footage and have spoken to their parents.

'Online material' allegations

Police said 75 images, which were classed as "indecent", were from the changing rooms at the independently run, co-educational school.

A further 465 were found to have been taken at the leisure centre's swimming pool and 38 from "two other locations".

Officers said in most of the pictures, the children's faces were not visible, or the quality of the image was so poor that they could not be identified.

imageImages were made of male pupils at Thorpe Hall School in Southend

The investigation into Mr Goldberg's computer was started after allegations he had bought material online which may have included images of naked teenage boys.

Mr Goldberg was spoken to, but not arrested, as officers thought there was "insufficient evidence" to do so at the time.

He was found dead in his home in Shoeburyness the following day.

'Surprised, angry, betrayed'

In a statement issued by Thorpe Hall School, head teacher Andrew Hampton said governors and staff were "very shocked" by the news, and everyone felt "surprised, angry and betrayed".

"There were no indications whatsoever that Mr Goldberg was leading a double life," he said.

"An incident such as this is very alarming and no-one could have foreseen it."

Mr Hampton said an inspection of the school's safeguarding policies in March this year found no improvements were needed.

"Despite this, we are re-enforcing our safeguarding procedures to ensure our provision goes beyond the highest standards expected of all UK schools and are as watertight as it is possible to have them," he said.

Read more http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-29426512#sa-ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa

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